The Problems of Michael Lacey

Michael Lacey was born on September 26, 1959. After high school he received a higher education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1987, earning his Ph.D. in mathematics in 1987. His thesis in Banach spaces solved an ongoing problem concerning iterated logarithm for empirical functions.

After officially earning his doctorate, he defended further postdoctoral positions at the Louisiana State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read more: Michael Lacey | GAtech and Michael Lacey | Wikipedia

He then took a teaching position at Indiana University in 1989 which he held until 1996. During these years he was inducted into the National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship. This was an induction by the National Science Foundation, a firm which supports education in mathematics, economics, social sciences, and computer science.

While in this fellowship, he began to study the bilinear Hilbert transform. He and a friend solved this previously unsolved problem, resulting in the pair being awarded the Salem Prize for their outstanding and groundbreaking work. The Salem prize was instigated by Raphael Salem in honor of her deceased husband.

In 1996 he left IU to become a Professor of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 2012 he was inducted into the American Mathematical Society. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://mathalliance.org/mentor/michael-lacey/ and http://nyjm.albany.edu/j/2017/23-8.html

Over the years he has served as the director of the training grants VIGRE, MCTP, and the Simons Foundations. He has also served as a mentor for many mathematics students through the years, 10 of which were postdoctorate students. Lacey continues to serve as a professor, specializing in the Harmonic Analysis Probability Fields.